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Author Topic: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog  (Read 3755 times)

MadJohnShaft

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #25 on: March 25, 2020, 06:42:38 PM »

And the bitch




I got one of these Ryobi portable table saws moments ago, $50 on nextdoor.com.  Not sure what part of essential travel that was but it was a mile away.     That will let me rip boards, which has been putting a damper on my free lumber acquisitions.   

A brother needs to make some 15 degree scarf joints, which has sucked doing by hand so far.




I guess I just need a drill press and a bench sander and I’m all set.  I haven’t put the Scroll Saw together yet or used the plunge router.   





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« Last Edit: March 25, 2020, 06:51:08 PM by MadJohnShaft »
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renfield

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #26 on: March 25, 2020, 06:57:10 PM »

take it to the Rich Republican Tool Blog
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MadJohnShaft

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #27 on: March 25, 2020, 07:07:10 PM »

$50?

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MadJohnShaft

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #28 on: March 25, 2020, 07:07:51 PM »

Remember on StonerRock.com everything that was over four dollars was a small fortune.

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renfield

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #29 on: March 25, 2020, 07:12:53 PM »

You don't get an exception just because you acquired that particular unit inexpensively, sorry
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juan11

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #30 on: March 25, 2020, 07:22:54 PM »

He only got it cheap because the rich neighbors next door got tired of tripping over it while accessing the Bentley.
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Pissy

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #31 on: March 25, 2020, 07:47:32 PM »

Looks like you’re the one losing a finger first.

I’m hesitant to say nice score.  I doubt you could sell it for much more than that. 

Honestly a hand saw and a 1” chisel would be faster to do your lap joints, and you’ll make mistakes more slowly.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2020, 08:00:36 PM by Pissy »
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MadJohnShaft

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #32 on: March 25, 2020, 08:08:04 PM »

$4


Hey, do not visit the hot dog thread

Edit:Spoiler


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« Last Edit: March 25, 2020, 08:56:33 PM by MadJohnShaft »
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Pissy

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #33 on: March 25, 2020, 08:17:53 PM »

Ruiner
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MadJohnShaft

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #34 on: March 25, 2020, 08:54:26 PM »


Spoiler Alert added
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MadJohnShaft

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #35 on: March 25, 2020, 09:03:27 PM »

I hope this isn’t too ‘wearing pants after 5pm’ for you macho, tough guy, blue color real men’s-


I did seven thin coats of polyethylene spray over the mod Podge-cats, which was previously under five coats. I had to go outside and spray a weird object outside every two hours.   Hi, new neighbors.  I’m your new neighbor and I’m doing something weirder than yesterday when I put up Christmas.

I want something that feels encased and magical - because a Big Cat two string Canjo is dangerous. One of the graphics was the cat coming out of the can, so I have the cat located so it’s coming out of the real can too.

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hole in the dark





« Last Edit: March 25, 2020, 09:06:38 PM by MadJohnShaft »
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Pissy

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #36 on: March 25, 2020, 09:13:25 PM »

That looks good.
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MadJohnShaft

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #37 on: March 25, 2020, 09:19:13 PM »

I am soooo glad I went around and bought a bunch of wood, cause virus.  I got a really nice piece of hard as iron maple for necks and a bunch of oak, poplar and a few fretboard shapes.  I wisely got some cheap pine for inside the box material. I used junk wood from my garage for the Canjos.


I’m going to try to do three string using surface mount parts so I can make one to use for playing, in place of the one I bought.  The laminated boxes with real wood instead of plywood or cardboard are nice because it’s real solid.  Thinking all yellow, including up the back of the neck - but the brass looks weird with it. Maybe that can be the thing.  Maybe I have a set in black.

I have a ‘psycho nob’ which is an on-guitar effects knob I could use on this one - the pickup is a humbucker so it will play nice with it.

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Got it all measured up.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2020, 09:22:45 PM by MadJohnShaft »
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Pissy

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #38 on: March 26, 2020, 08:29:37 AM »

Where does the scarf joint go?
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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #39 on: March 26, 2020, 09:31:12 AM »

For the head for the tuning pegs - you can scoop out a little bit or add a scarf joint to get a little back angle on the nut.  The head needs to be down to about 5/8 thick so it addresses two issues - you cut if off at 15 degress, make it 5/8” thick and rotate and glue in place.  You can put the joint in the neck or in the head.

« Last Edit: March 26, 2020, 11:55:26 AM by MadJohnShaft »
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Pissy

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #40 on: March 26, 2020, 10:10:45 AM »

That’s where Gibson’s break. 
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MadJohnShaft

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #41 on: March 26, 2020, 11:53:28 AM »


On the Canjos, as a test I snipped the head off two little tacks and used those when I glued the scarf joint together- there’s no easy way to get the clamps to press them together without also sliding the two pieces apart, you sort of have to overshoot and let it drift into place.   The little tacks are small enough to be out of the way if they land in a tuner hole but big enough to add enough resistance to let the glue do its thing.

CBGitty is the big part supplier and they are running a fun contest in April with prizes. 
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Pissy

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #42 on: March 26, 2020, 12:10:31 PM »

Perhaps use a clamp as a stop on each side of the joint - essentially clamping nothing, to keep the movement to a minimum when you clamp the money shot... so to speak.   Or clamp scrap blocks on either side. 

The pins are a good idea too.
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Pissy

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #43 on: March 26, 2020, 05:13:48 PM »

Caveman Hand Tool Entry #6. A quick look at sharpening. Really quick.

Sharpening is a hotly debated topic among many woodworkers.  Probably the most broadly debated.  To me it doesn’t make sense to do anything other than finding a method that works, and sticking with it. 

This is how I sharpen my chisels and plane irons. Other whackado items take on a similar method with obvious accommodations- like that router plane bit for example. 

This is my sharpening setup.  There are tons of ways to go in terms of a method, but this is mine.

It consists of 4 diamond plates from extra coarse to extra fine, left to right.  Also on the far right is a leather strop. Other methods include oilstones, waterstones and flat glass and sandpaper. 

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I do mine freehand. Conventionally there are a host of jigs and attachments that can be employed to impart a perfect 25 or 30 degree angle and i started off using those methods, but eventually settled on freehand for how quickly it gets the job done. 

So first, I squirt water on the plates.
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Then i hold the iron bevel down and sideways at about the proper angle and do my best to lock my wrists.  What I have learned about this method is i can see water squirt out from under the bevel and I use that indicator to know when I have the correct angle. 

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I then sweep back and forth. 

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Doing this produces a burr on the backside of the iron, so I then turn it over and rub it flat on the plate. 

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l pic

I do this for at least the two middle plates normally as my irons and chisels normally only need freshening up.  All four plates if starting from scratch on a completely new bevel.  Bevel side first, backside second, then the next plate. 

Once the platework is complete, it should be pretty sharp.  But I then move to the last step, which is drawing it backwards on the strop.  The strop itself is “charged” with honing compound, and basically polishes the new edge. Then the backside flat about 10 times.  It normally shave at this point. 

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renfield

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #44 on: March 26, 2020, 05:25:29 PM »

I have everything I need to sharpen my plane iron except the strop. Although maybe I just think it needs to be sharpened because I don't know how to properly use the tool.

Just copped Hayward's Carpentry for Beginners! Will continue monitoring this thread
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Pissy

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #45 on: March 26, 2020, 06:08:29 PM »

I don’t have that one, but much of the same stuff is in many of them.  Same with Wearing. 

I’ll try to cover what I know about hand planes at some point.  It’s a really deep subject. 
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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #46 on: March 26, 2020, 06:44:28 PM »

I sharpen on Japanese wet stones, up to about 10k. Then rouge/stropping. If I'm not feeling like really getting into sharpening for the day, I use my 1x42 and a felt belt with rouge. It -almost- gets me as sharp as the stones, but in like a quarter of the time. I'm definitely buying new chisels this year. Torn between Veritas and getting something Japanese with a hollow ground back.
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Pissy

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #47 on: March 26, 2020, 07:41:21 PM »

If you want among the best, Blue Spruce chisels are the bees knees.  Buy them one per month and it won’t hurt much.  You only need 6 or so.

Only issue with Japanese is the metric thing, but it isn’t that big a deal. 
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MadJohnShaft

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #48 on: March 26, 2020, 08:11:00 PM »

Until Godzilla shows up.
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Pissy

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #49 on: March 26, 2020, 08:25:52 PM »

Caveman hand tool entry #7.0:  An intro to bench planes. 

Anyone who knows what a handplane is thinks of this style of tool as a kneejerk. In reality the term refers to a myriad of tools that all do the same thing to a wood surface in a myriad of different ways.  These planes I’m describing in this entry are referred to as bench planes to distinguish them from other types like molding planes and rabbet planes. 

Stanley was/is the manufacturer of handplanes since around the 1870’s or so and their design was referred to as a Bailey.  You can google how Stanley and Bailey came together as a company or how Stanley perhaps paid royalties or whatever, all you really need to know is Stanley/Bailey set the benchmark, and tons of other manufacturers followed their lead.

All of Stanley's tools were classified by numbers.  The #5 was far and away the most popular plane.  It was referred to as a jack plane as in the jack of all trades. Actually I think this term was derived prior to the advent of metallic planes, when they were made out of wood, but I may be mistaken.

For the most part a handtool kit contains the following three planes: #4, #5 and #7 from left to right below. 

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Describing these planes in order that they would be used, the #5 is the most prolific.  It’s called the jack plane for a reason.  It will actually do a decent job of all three tasks the three planes together are intended for.  Primarily in this group, it would be used to flatten the face of a board.  Most commonly worked back and forth ACROSS the grain of the wood taking deep bites, but in the direction the grain is weakest.  I’ll show this in a later entry. This operation is called trying and is the root of the phrase “tried and true”.

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The #4 is the smoothing plane and is for taking out all the furrows that are inevitable from the previous process. The shavings are light and the surface should be pretty damn smooth once complete.  Smoother that can be had by sanding or machine.  Read that last sentence again. 

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The #7 is the jointer plane and is for making an edge of a board square to that face you just tried up. It’s length is on purpose to keep the edge as straight as possible.

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Stanley has made millions of these planes and a very large percentage of them remain.  Over the years design changes here and there gave way to referencing eras as “type”. During WW2 for example, brass was needed for the war effort so any part that was normally brass (the depth adjustment wheel) was replaced with a hard rubber wheel.   

One such design change was the sole of the plane.  Some were smooth and flat and some were corrugated, and I think both were offered as options at the same time.  The selling point of this corrugated feature was that it reduced friction- this is not true.  But the uneducated would not really know this. 

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All of that to say if you look for one of these planes, don’t bother worrying about whether the bottom is smooth or corrugated.  They both work fine.

Stanley made bench plane in sizes from smallest to largest (mostly) in the form of numbers 1,2,3,4,4 1/2 ( same length but wider than the 4), 5, 5 1/4(same length but narrower than the 5) 5 1/2 (same length but wider than the 5) 6,7 and 8.   The 1 these days is highly collectible, but utterly useless.  The 2 is just kinda useless, and the 3 is getting there. 

« Last Edit: March 26, 2020, 10:43:08 PM by Pissy »
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