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Author Topic: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog  (Read 3753 times)

RAGER

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #50 on: March 26, 2020, 11:53:02 PM »

I got a rawhide hammer. I’ll post a pic.
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Pissy

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #51 on: March 27, 2020, 01:06:05 AM »

Total caveman.
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Pissy

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #52 on: March 27, 2020, 10:09:34 AM »

Caveman hand tool entry #7.1:  The Wooden Bench Planes

Wooden hand planes, not surprisingly predate metallic planes by a few hundred years.  Simple in principle but efficient in production, metallic planes were designed to mimic them, while introducing features that make operation easier.  At least that was the intent. 

Advantages of using wooden planes vs metallic planes are huge.  For one, they are much lighter and less of a strain to work with. They also are easier to “lubricate” the sole with wax so when you run them over a board, it’s slick. That slickness imparts a smooth shiny surface right out of the gate.  You can wax a metallic plane’s sole, and it helps, but nothing like a wood sole. 

The planes are most often made of beech.  The reason for this is once dry, beech is quite stable and isn’t affected by season humidity and temperature changes as other woods are.

As with the previous entry, there are basically three sizes.  The Smoother, The Jack and the Jointer. 

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Maintenance on these is a bit different than metallic planes.  For one thing, adjusting the depth of cut is a crude endeavor.  You use a hammer to tap the iron for a deeper cut. 

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To pull the iron back, you actually tap on the body of the plane at the very back.  Inertia does the rest.

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The iron is held in place by a wedge. It too is tapped in with a hammer directly and removed by tapping the back of the plane.  As such, whenever you tap the iron back, you need to also hit the wedge to keep it seated. 

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Being made out of wood, the sole of the planes wear, and develop grooves and whatnot.  So periodically, the soles need to be flattened. 

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Flattening the sole is done with another plane. Simple as that.  But when he sole is flattened, material is removed and the eventually the mouth opens up.  When this happens, a piece of wood is scabbed into the sole of the plane to close it back up.

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Having a tight mouth hole is advantageous (heh) because the wood fibers ahead of the cutting iron stay compressed and stave off tear out.

My wooden hand planes probably date to around 1900. Maybe some are earlier. I find them on ebay, but I only buy from a couple of sellers.  I also find them in Antique Malls. 



« Last Edit: March 27, 2020, 10:15:40 AM by Pissy »
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RAGER

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #53 on: March 27, 2020, 10:21:37 AM »

Sockets vegan food is flattening my soul.

But oh yeah. Gotta find that rawhide hammer.
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socket

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #54 on: March 27, 2020, 10:24:45 AM »

Smash!

Shaft, did I do that right?
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Pissy

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #55 on: March 27, 2020, 02:33:57 PM »

Caveman hand tool entry #7.2: The transitional bench planes.

In the grand timeline of planes, one might look at a transitional and assume that it was the stepping stone chronologically between the older wooden planes and the newer designed metallic one.  It would only make sense.  In fact though they were made well after the Bailey plane was invented.

 The thought was that at the time many craftsmen preferred the feel of a wood plane, the weight of it, how it would glide so much more smoothly, but the features of the Bailey design made adjustments so easy.  It had always been a difficult trade off. 

Enter the transitional plane. 

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Not much need to go in to great length here, but a few items to note are that the weight of these, the way they glide when set up well both mimic a wooden planes operation.  But the ease of making depth and side to side adjustments of the cutting iron mimic those of a metallic plane.  In my view these are my favorite to use for those reasons.  When set up well, they’re awesome.

Smoothers, Jacks and Jointer sizes correspond here as before. 
« Last Edit: March 27, 2020, 02:35:32 PM by Pissy »
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Pissy

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #56 on: March 27, 2020, 04:56:37 PM »

Caveman hand tool entry #8: Winding sticks.

Winding sticks (pronounced like winding a coil of rope, not like the breeze) are used to gauge the amount of twist (or wind) that any particular board may have. 

I made these out of purpleheart.

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The principal is when laid across each end of a board you crouch down and look down the length of the board and compare the stick closest to you with the one furthest away.  You’ll notice one of these sticks has light colored maple ends. This is to help you see the contrast between the two stick better. 

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Armed with that knowledge you know where you need to concentrate you’re effort to bring down this corner or that corner with your jack plane.   

Just so happens this board doesn’t have much wind, so it’s difficult to see.  Lucky me.
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Pissy

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #57 on: March 27, 2020, 05:47:37 PM »

Caveman hand tool entry #9: Trying a surface.

Roughsawn lumber needs to be flattened with square edges first and foremost before you can make anything with it.  Even with power tools, if the wood ain’t flat and straight sending it directly through a tablesaw or planer will not fix it. A rocking chair foot sent through a planer will yield a thinner smoother rocking chair foot. 

So here is a piece of cherry that is roughsawn.  I’m going to flatten (or “try”) smooth and joint one edge.  Once that is complete, I can send it through a power planer to get the second side true to the first, and run it through a tablesaw to get the second edge true.

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I didn’t make an entry for my straight edge. Self explanatory.

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Notice the daylight under the straight edge. This side of the board is cupped. I work this side because it’s easier than the crowned side for some reason.  Not sure why, but it is. 

Using the winding sticks in conjunction with the straight edge, I can see where I need to concentrate.

I begin by taking cuts across the grain on the cupped face.  This is quite easy work and the shaving that are produced are kinda like chewed up popsicle sticks.  This is called traversing across the grain. 

The last passes are always with the grain. This takes away any high spots from the rougher traversing operation. 
At the end, the straight edge from corner to corner both ways tells me I got it. 

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Then I take the #4 smoothing plane and get it shiny. These shaving are much more like whisps of light floating clouds.  Not much material being removed, but everything is getting smooth. This motion is always with the grain.
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Pretty smooth.

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Once it’s flat first, smooth second, I mark the face to remind me its been completed and I don’t confuse surfaces.  That mark that I put on there is traditional. 

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Then I flip the board on its edge and grab the #7 jointer.  It only takes a few passes to get through the saw marks, but in order to get the edge square to the finished face, you have to feel your way into it.

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 It’s pretty amazing how close you can get with just your gut feel.

But you put your hand at the front of the plane and ride along with it feeling the board underneath to give you an idea of how square the edge you are creating is.   

Check it with a square

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Then mark the edge with a v that points to the finished face.  Traditional mark as well.
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From there I can trust the face and edges to work well, and everything gets easier when the stock is flat and straight. Otherwise joints don’t go together well, lines get cooked.... mass hysteria. 

This took about 20 minutes with me taking pictures.  If i did it with a powered planer, It may have been quicker, but not much. 

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mortlock

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #58 on: March 27, 2020, 09:24:51 PM »

I hate tools.
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MadJohnShaft

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #59 on: March 28, 2020, 07:04:10 AM »

Lots of use you'll be in the new end times. Can you dig holes?





« Last Edit: March 28, 2020, 08:33:42 AM by MadJohnShaft »
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MadJohnShaft

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #60 on: March 28, 2020, 12:51:54 PM »


Yeah, it worked, more or less


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RAGER

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #61 on: March 28, 2020, 12:55:59 PM »

I like the sound of the canjo better. Nice work.
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MadJohnShaft

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #62 on: March 28, 2020, 01:09:42 PM »

When you rap on the neck you want whole thing to vibrate like a xylophone. 

This one is a little deader sounding than the first one which was very lively.    I think I need a washer betwix can and stick and something more like a heavier piece of metal to go thru the back of the can, I think the rivets I used actually dampen the string where it hits the inside of the rivet. I will saw those off if I ever open it up again.   Instead of just vibrating freely at the 25 inch mark.

I got the scale and intonation perfect on this one, on the first Canjo the zero fret’s a little off.


If you do full whoopiedeedoo it’s fun

« Last Edit: March 28, 2020, 04:54:40 PM by MadJohnShaft »
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RAGER

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #63 on: March 28, 2020, 01:48:30 PM »

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Pissy

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #64 on: March 28, 2020, 11:12:47 PM »

I like that you chew gum and play like you’re Paul Nugent.
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RAGER

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #65 on: March 29, 2020, 12:27:42 AM »

He doan gif a fuk.
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renfield

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #66 on: March 29, 2020, 09:08:35 PM »

This is a review of a trowel, which is a type of caveman tool.


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Muffin Man

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #67 on: March 29, 2020, 09:16:30 PM »

Keep your tools in your bag, man
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MadJohnShaft

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #68 on: March 30, 2020, 08:33:00 AM »

Pissy, make me some 1.5 x 0.75 x 32” neck blanks out of exotic hardwoods.  Fretboards are the same but like 0.25” thick and like 25 inch max.  Canjo necks are an inch wide.
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Pissy

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #69 on: March 30, 2020, 08:38:23 AM »

You just got a tablesaw
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renfield

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #70 on: March 30, 2020, 01:14:05 PM »


Because you aren’t building things, with your hands

Is that so, MadWrongShaft? Then why am I ripping 2x's by hand with a $15 saw

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I should have the legs for my roman workbench finished and glued later today, will post depending on how ashamed I am of the results
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MadJohnShaft

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #71 on: March 30, 2020, 01:48:08 PM »

That’s the spirit.   Get one of those Japanese two sided floppy things everyone seems to have.



You can paint wood crazy bright colors using food coloring.  I am needing to get back to work fretting. I have slots to cut and frets to set. 

I am putting off cutting a 15 degree scarf joint.  I am putting off the electrical work on both. 


And a bass neck to Tung Oil.    I should get the two necks up to the finishing stage and get all that painting and drying going at once.   
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RAGER

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #72 on: March 30, 2020, 01:50:49 PM »

Where the hell did I put that damn rawhide hammer. That thing was cool.
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renfield

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #73 on: March 30, 2020, 01:57:45 PM »

It wouldn't be the appropriate tool for such a large cut, but it's always good to have on hand for the vibes.

Volume way up:
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Pissy

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Re: Cave Man Hand Tool Blog
« Reply #74 on: March 30, 2020, 02:14:41 PM »

I call them sudoku saws.

You doing the 8 legged roman bench?   The low one?

I need to throw together a bluebird house.  For bluebirds.  They say they need to face east, have the entry hole 4-6ft off the ground, pointed to open space, but facing a tree or bush 60-100ft away , so they can gather food while watching the house.  And the hole needs to be precisely 1 1/2” in diameter-big enough for them, but too small for predators.  And the floor 6-10” from the bottom of the hole. And at least 60ft away from another nest.

Picky little fuckers.

I find it amazing when you a hang a birdhouse from a string, and the thing twists and sways and turns, and the birds don’t care.  They call it home anyways. 

Not so with bluebirds, I guess.

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